Filter by country:

You are here

Home

Children's Rights

Congolese women stitching community back together

September 5, 2012

As documented in a new report from the Enough Project, which ranks electronics firms on their progress in cleaning up their supply chains of conflict minerals, there are glimmers of hope for eastern Congo despite ongoing violence there, which is driven partly by conflict minerals.

South Africa: Women are the primary education financers for their families

September 10, 2012

"Educate a girl, and you educate a village," an African proverb goes, illustrating the ripple effect of educating women and the role that women play in making a difference in the lives of those around them.

Swaziland: New Legislation Outlaws Child Marriage

September 10, 2012

MBABANE- Swazi men who continue to marry underage girls through the age-old Swazi custom kwendzisa will now be breaking the law.

Kwendzisa is a process where the parent or guardian marries off a girl child to an adult male without her consent.

Afghanistan: End trend of Women Jailed for ‘Running Away’

September 18, 2012

(Kabul) – High-level Afghan government officials have for the first time publicly confirmed that it is not a criminal offense for women and girls to “run away” from home, Human Rights Watch said today. The officials also confirmed fleeing violence or running away was not a basis for women’s detention or prosecution.

! الافراج عن ليلى ابراهيم عيسى ! وقف الرجم في السودان

July 21, 2012

We are grateful to everyone who took part in this action, and extend thanks on behalf of our Sudanese sisters as well, who believe the international advocacy by the diverse groups and individuals who joined to call to action had a huge and positive impact on the Court’s decision.

Thank you for your support! Together we do make a difference!

September 12, 2012

_________________________________________________________

 

 

Jordan & Lebanon: Citizenship rights for children

July 27, 2012

In Jordan and Lebanon, women married to foreigners are taking to the streets to fight for their children's citizenship rights.

In both countries, women who marry non-nationals are unable to confer nationality on their child or spouse, rendering their families foreigners in the eyes of the law, and denying them rights and access to key public services. In contrast, men from those countries who marry foreigners face no such obstacles.

Sudan: Layla Ibrahim Issa - Another woman sentenced to death by stoning. Take action now!

July 21, 2012

Update: Layla has been released!

The Court of Appeals handling Layla’s case has dropped the sentence of stoning, and changed the charge to “egregious acts”, for which it was determined Layla had spent enough time in prison. Our Sudanese networkers are still monitoring the situation, in order to ensure that the changed charges do not result in further violations of Layla’s rights, or those of her child. For now, Layla Ibrahim Issa is free, and not facing any further prison time. We will continue to keep you posted on any developments for Layla, or other similar cases in Sudan. We are grateful to everyone who took part in this action, and extend thanks on behalf of our Sudanese sisters as well, who believe the international advocacy by the diverse groups and individuals who joined to call to action had a huge and positive impact on the Court’s decision.

Thank you for your support! Together we do make a difference!

UN: Harmful Traditional Practices - statement by Rashida Manjoo, UNSRVAW

June 27, 2012

Throughout the world, there are practices that are violent towards women and girls and harmful to their well-being overall. Young girls are circumcised, bound by severe dress codes, denied property rights or killed for the sake of honour in the family. Although these and other practices constitute a form of violence, they have often avoided national and international scrutiny because they are seen as traditional practices that deserve tolerance and respect. This highlights how the universality of human rights is often denied when it comes to the rights of women and girls, and how cultural relativism can be wrongly used to allow for inhumane and discriminatory practices against women.

South Africa: Bride abductions 'a distortion' of South Africa's culture

July 12, 2012

When cows are traded for an unwilling bride, rural Zulu women lose their freedom, and more. Called thwala, the practice is often abused, activists say.

 NORTHWEST OF HOWICK, South Africa —

— She was named Democracy in Zulu, at a time when her country had none.

A few years later, the constitution born of the historic South African election that ended apartheid made Nonkululeko "free" and "equal." But the eight cows paid for her as a bride price mean that she is neither.

UN: Sierra Leone’s health minister to serve as UN envoy on sexual violence in conflict

June 22, 2012

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has appointed Zainab Hawa Bangura, currently the Minister of Health and Sanitation of Sierra Leone, as his new Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict.

She will replace Margot Wallström, a Swedish politician with a long history of defending women’s rights, who had served in the position since it was created two years ago.

Pages