Browse by Country

Browse by Region

You are here

Home » 'Honor' crimes

Resources: 'Honor' crimes

Selected International Human Rights Materials Addressing 'Crimes of Honour'

February, 2014

This collection of international human rights materials is an update of the collection of the same name of 2003, which was produced by the Project on “Strategies of Response to „Crimes of Honour‟ Against Women” jointly co-ordinated by CIMEL (Centre of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law) and INTERIGHTS (International Centre for the Legal Protection of Human Rights).

 

To read the full resource, please download the pdf

Pakistan: Policeman uses paintbrush to fight crimes against women

September, 2012

As a police officer in Islamabad, Mehmood Ahmed has witnessed how women in Pakistan are often the victims of grave social injustices from forced marriages to acid-throwings and so-called honour killings.

The Missing Link: A Joined Up Approach to Addressing Harmful Practices in London

September, 2011

This study was commissioned and funded by the Greater London Authority to address a knowledge gap on the needs of black, minority ethnic and refugee (BMER) women experiencing harmful practices (HPs). The specific aim of the study was to provide a document which would help to engage commissioners, funders, policy-makers and frontline practitioners to improve the way London responds to HPs. The study was carried out between December 2010 and March 2011.

In the Name of the Family

January, 2010
Shelley Saywell (WMM)

Schoolgirl Aqsa Parvez, sisters Amina and Sarah Said, and college student Fauzia Muhammad were all North American teenagers—and victims of premeditated, murderous attacks by male family members. Only Muhammad survived. Emmy® winner Shelley Saywell examines each case in depth in this riveting investigation of "honor killings" of girls in Muslim immigrant families. Not sanctioned by Islam, the brutalization and violence against young women for defying male authority derives from ancient tribal notions of honor and family shame. 

It’s Not Just Domestic Violence: The Beginner’s Guide to 16 Types of Violence Against Women

December, 2010
The Pixel Project

There are many reasons why Violence Against Women is possibly the most widespread and intractable human rights violations in human history: It is embedded in social structures; It is part of cultural customs; It is due to gender inequality; It is due to gender-based economic inequality; It is due to patriarchal strictures… the list of factors goes on and on and many have expounded on it.

Yet even while it is so entrenched an issue, many people have problems recognising gender-based violence even when they are come face-to-face with it simply because:

Forced Marriage and Honour Killing Checksheet

June, 2011
Pixel Project

Helping Forced marriages and honour killings are often intertwined. Marriage can be forced to save honour, and women can be murdered for rejecting a forced marriage.[5]

The issue of ‘honour’ is also one of links with the community. Unlike domestic violence, a woman who runs away from a forced marriage or honour killing will be severing links with her family and her culture. There may be no help coming from those parties.

Forced Marriage and Honour Killing Checksheet

June, 2011
Pixel Project

Helping Forced marriages and honour killings are often intertwined. Marriage can be forced to save honour, and women can be murdered for rejecting a forced marriage.

The issue of ‘honour’ is also one of links with the community. Unlike domestic violence, a woman who runs away from a forced marriage or honour killing will be severing links with her family and her culture. There may be no help coming from those parties.

Killing in the name of “honour”: The South Asian Community in the Canadian Context

August, 2010
Saima Ishaq

“Honour Killing” is defined as the act of killing a person, usually a female relative (i.e. daughter, wife), who is taught to have brought dishonour to the family by engaging in “unacceptable” sexual behaviours. Studies have shown that those who commit this homicidal act are generally blood related to the victim (i.e. fathers, brothers, cousins, and sometimes other female relatives such as mothers have also been documented as being supporters). Most research and studies on “honour killings” have been conducted in the Middle East and South Asia and just recently in the U.K., Sweden, and Norway. However, little is known about this new social phenomenon in Canada.