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Preventing and eliminating child, early and forced marriage - Report of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

July, 2014

Summary

Taking into consideration information received from States, United Nations agencies, civil society groups and other relevant stakeholders, the report discusses the international norms and standards applicable to child, early and forced marriage and the human rights impact of the practice on women and girls. The report addresses the various factors that contribute to child, early and forced marriage and further analyses existing measures and strategies to prevent and eliminate child, early and forced marriage with a particular focus on challenges, achievements, best practices and implementation gaps.

Too Young to Wed: The Growing Problem of Child Marriage Among Syrian Girls in Jordan

July, 2014

War in Syria has killed more than 10,000 children.  More than 1 million more have fled the country in fear, while millions more have been displaced inside Syria. This briefing looks at a disturbing but less publicised impact of the crisis: the increase in the numbers of girls who have been forced to marry.

 

To read the full report by Save the Children please download the attached pdf.

Protecting the Girl Child: Using the Law to End Child Marriage

January, 2014

This report from Equality now - full title 'Protecting the Girl Child: Using the law to end child, early, and forced marriage and related human rights violatiosn' - is comprised of the following sections:

 

-Introduction
-Prioritizing the Elimination of Child Marriage
-Using International Law to End Child, Early and
-Forced Marriage
-National Law – A Fundamental Tool to End Child,
-Early and Forced Marriage
-National Surveys
-Conclusion
-What You Can Do
-Acknowledgements

 

Solutions to End Child Marriage: Summary of the Evidence

November, 2013

A summary of the ICRW's review of 150 programs with a child marriage component, identifying five key strategies used to prevent or delay child marriages:

  • Empower girls with information, skills, and support networks
  • Educate and rally parents and community members
  • Enhance girls' access to high-quality education
  • Provide economic support and incentives to girls and their families
  • Encourage supportive laws and policies

Stolen Lives, Empty Classrooms: An Overview on the Girl Marriages in Iran

October, 2013

Forced marriages result from harmful traditional practices1 justified in the name of cultural, economic, political and/or legal standards. Forced marriages are a phenomenon tantamount to slavery, as explicated in a report by a United Nations Special Rapporteur, and often affect boys and girls under 18 years of age, especially under 10. 2 Global statistics demonstrate that every minute an average of 27 girls are forced into marriage.

Marrying Too Young

December, 2012

This report is a clarion call to decision makers, parents, communities and to the world to end child marriage. It documents the current scope, prevalence and inequities associated with child marriage and highlights that by 2020, Some 142 million girls will be married by their 18th birthday if current trends continue.

Girls Not Brides: Traditions can change - Ending child marriage

October, 2012

“Change happens through protecting girls rights in law and practice, empowering them to take control of their own bodies and destinies, and even become leaders and change-makers themselves. Change happens through raising community awareness of the dangers of child marriage, and the benefits of stopping this practice. Imagine if we connect all those around the world who are working bravely to end child marriage. Imagine the change of scale possible.” - Mary Robinson,  the Elders

 

 

التجريم حسب النوع: النظر لقوانين الزنا باعتبارها عنفا ضد المرأة في البيئات الإسلامية

March, 2010
Ziba Mir Hosseini

English | Français |  Bahasa Indonesia |  فارسی 

In this discussion paper, I show how zina laws and the criminalization of consensual sexual activity can also be challenged from within Islamic legal tradition. Far from mutually opposed, approaches from Islamic studies, feminism and human rights perspectives can be mutually reinforcing, particularly in mounting an effective campaign against revived zina laws. By exploring the intersections between religion, culture and law that legitimate violence in the regulation of sexuality, the paper aims to contribute to the development of a contextual and integrated approach to the abolition of zina laws. In so doing, I hope to broaden the scope of the debate over concepts and strategies of the SKSW Campaign.