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Resources: North America

الشرق الأوسط وشمال أفريقيا: بوادر لاستمرار الاحتجاجات والقمع في 2012

January, 2012

حذرت منظمة العفو الدولية اليوم في تقرير جديد حول الأحداث المأسوية التي شهدتها السنة الفائتة من أنه من المرجح أن يستمر تسميم أجواء الشرق الأوسط وشمال أفريقيا في 2012 جراء العنف والقمع الذي تمارسه الدول، ما لم تستيقظ الحكومات في الإقليم والقوى الدولية إلى مدى عمق التغيرات المطلوبة منها للتعامل مع ما يحدث.

Survey on Forced Marriage in Immigrant Communities in the United States

September, 2011

The Tahirih Justice Center (Tahirih) is one of the nation’s foremost legal defense organizations protecting women and girls fleeing human rights abuses. Through direct legal services, public policy advocacy, and public education and outreach, since 1997, Tahirih has assisted over 12,000 immigrant women and children from all over the world fleeing such abuses as domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking, torture, female genital mutilation, “honor” crimes, and forced marriage. Tahirih also leads national advocacy campaigns on a range of issues, building on our direct services experiences, to press for systemic changes in laws, policies, and practices to better protect women and girls from violence.

Guide to Establishing the Asylum Eligibility of Victims of Human Trafficking and Forced Marriage

January, 2011

Every year, hundreds of thousands of people become victims of human trafficking or forced marriage. Some are taken away from their home countries and moved abroad, where they are forced to engage in prostitution, other forms of labor, or marriage. Others are trafficked internally within their countries of origin. Those who escape or are rescued may want nothing more than to return home. Others may legitimately fear being punished or re-trafficked if they return. Trafficked persons who do not wish to return home must seek protection in another country.

What Afghans Want

June, 2010

Over a year ago on July 20, 2010 world leaders met to discuss the future of Afghanistan at the Kabul Conference. Oxfam International asked ordinary Afghans what they want to come out of the talks. In spite of intense lobbying, women were largely excluded from the conference. “…only two women beside government ministers took part in the Kabul Conference. 

Religiosity, Christian Fundamentalism, And Intimate Partner Violence Among U.S. College Students

January, 2010

Student survey data show general religiosity did not correlate with violence approval, psychological aggression, or intimate partner violence, but Christian fundamentalism did with violence approval and intimate partner violence. Read the study here.

In the Name of the Family

January, 2010
Shelley Saywell (WMM)

Schoolgirl Aqsa Parvez, sisters Amina and Sarah Said, and college student Fauzia Muhammad were all North American teenagers—and victims of premeditated, murderous attacks by male family members. Only Muhammad survived. Emmy® winner Shelley Saywell examines each case in depth in this riveting investigation of "honor killings" of girls in Muslim immigrant families. Not sanctioned by Islam, the brutalization and violence against young women for defying male authority derives from ancient tribal notions of honor and family shame. 

Canada: Videos of Depositions on polygamy

June, 2011


Shield and Refuge has provided links to online video of depositions of former Fundamentalists and polygamists who were interviewed by lawyers trying to uphold the anti-polygamy laws in Canada. They are unedited, and so viewer discretion is advised.

Available Depositions:

Killing in the name of “honour”: The South Asian Community in the Canadian Context

August, 2010
Saima Ishaq

“Honour Killing” is defined as the act of killing a person, usually a female relative (i.e. daughter, wife), who is taught to have brought dishonour to the family by engaging in “unacceptable” sexual behaviours. Studies have shown that those who commit this homicidal act are generally blood related to the victim (i.e. fathers, brothers, cousins, and sometimes other female relatives such as mothers have also been documented as being supporters). Most research and studies on “honour killings” have been conducted in the Middle East and South Asia and just recently in the U.K., Sweden, and Norway. However, little is known about this new social phenomenon in Canada.