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Manual on Women Human Rights Defenders - Arabic

June, 2012

Executive Summary- The Women Human Rights Defenders program at Nazra for Feminist Studies is launching its manual on Women Human Rights Defenders (WHRDs). Rather than translate into Arabic manuals that have been produced by other organizations, the WHRD program opted to produce it’s a manual that is especially tailored to the Egyptian context.

The Arab Spring: 20 Measures for Equality

March, 2012

Women, alongside men, participated in the protest movements that shook the Arab world in 2011 demanding freedom, equality, justice and democracy. Women, as well as men, paid and continue to pay a high price for their struggles. Today women must be able to play their full part in building the futures of their countries. Women's participation in public and political life, on an equal basis with men, is an essential condition for democracy and social justice, values at the heart of the Arab spring.

Year of Rebellion: The State of Human Rights in the Middle East and North Africa

January, 2012

Repression and state violence is likely to continue to plague the Middle East and North Africa in 2012 unless governments in the region and international powers wake up to the scale of the changes being demanded of them, Amnesty International warned today in a new report into the dramatic events of the last year.

In the 80-page Year of Rebellion: State of Human Rights in the Middle East and North Africa, the organization describes how governments across the region were willing in 2011 to deploy extreme violence in an attempt to resist unprecedented calls for fundamental reform.

Gender-Based Violence in Southern Sudan: Justice for Women Long Overdue

December, 2011

A Study for the Enough Project by the Allard K. Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic at Yale Law School

INTRODUCTION

Southern Sudan has a history of gender-based violence (GBV) during times of conflict and instability. GBV is any act of violence against women that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual, or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or private life.2

What the Women Say: The Arab Spring & Implications for Women

December, 2011

As the Arab world rumbles and shakes, women in the region are experiencing the good, the bad and the ugly that comes with instability, transition and crisis. From Tunisia and Egypt to Syria, Libya and Bahrain, women have been present and vocal in the street protest movements, standing shoulder to shoulder with the men, resisting the batons and tear gas, and being killed. Many have been key organizers and leaders in social networking, helping to articulate a common message and vision of freedom, democracy and equality, and providing logistical support to men at the frontlines of violence. They have also faced many of the same physical and sexual threats and risks that women elsewhere have encountered during crises and transitions, including harassment, assault and death. Despite their contribution, they are again facing exclusion from the political processes under way.

Multi-Sectoral Approach to Women's Rights in Africa

June, 2011

In response to the growing need for implementation tools, the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women has released a detailed manual on promoting women’s rights. The release comes at a critical time after many governments have ratified human rights treaties but have yet to fully adopt the commitments in national law.

Confronting Gender-Based Violence against Women and Girls in Chad.

September, 2011
UNICEF

UNICEF's Cheryl Uys-Allie reports on initiatives led by women to confront gender-based violence against women and girls in Chad. Watch the video below.


Silent No More: The untapped potential of the church in addressing sexual violence

March, 2011

This report, Silent No More, calls all churches to account and to action. It paints a painfully honest picture of the way churches have perpetuated a culture of silence around sexual violence and have largely failed to respond to the crisis and may even worsen the impact by reinforcing stigma and discrimination experienced by survivors.

Defying the Odds: Lessons learnt from Men for Gender Equality Now

July, 2011

In 2001, the African Women’s Development and Communication Network (FEMNET) took the first steps towards creating an African network of male activists against gender-based violence. In a regional consultative meeting which was organized by FEMNET that year, Kenyan men came together to form a local initiative “Men for Gender Equality Now” (MEGEN). This Project was facilitated and supported by FEMNET from 2004 to 2008 when the project became independent.

Intimate Partner Violence: High costs to Households and Communities

January, 2011
ICRW

ICRW and its partners, Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies (BIDS), Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC) in Uganda and Hassan II University in Morocco, with support from UNFPA, undertook a three-country study in Bangladesh, Morocco and Uganda to estimate the economic costs of intimate partner violence at the household and community levels, where its impact is most direct and immediate. The focus on intimate partner violence was motivated by the fact that this is the most common form of violence against women.

More Under the Veil: Women and Muslim Fundamentalism in MENA

May, 2011


It is important to begin any discussion related to religious fundamentalism with an exploration of what is meant by the term “fundamentalism.” The word “fundamentalism” was originally coined in reference to a movement within the Protestant community of the United States in the early part of the 20th century. In the broadest sense, fundamentalism can be understood as “a selective retrieval and imposition of...[religious] law and sacred texts as the basis for a modern socio-political order” (Hardacre 1994:130).

 

Mutilations génitales féminines et droits humains en Afrique

April, 1998
Fatou Sow

Les armes se sont à peine tues après plusieurs années de lutte entre groupes fratricides, que la Sierra Leone est revenue à la une de l’actualité africaine, pour un fait classé divers. En effet, le quotidien sénégalais, Le Soleil, rapportant une dépêche de l’Agence France-Presse, titrait : « Arrêt des excisions pendant le Ramadan » (20 janvier 1977). Quelques semaines plus tôt, la même agence s’était fait l’écho d’un événement survenu dans un camp de réfugiés de Grafton, à une centaine de Km de Freetown, la capitale.

Stoning is Not our Culture: A Comparative Analysis of Human Rights and Religious Discourses in Iran and Nigeria

March, 2010
Rochelle Terman & Mufuliat Fijabi

  عربي |  فارسی |

Stoning is a cruel form of torture that is used to punish men and women for adultery and other 'improper' sexual relations. It is currently sanctioned by law and carried out by state actors in at least two countries, and at least seven individuals have been stoned to death in the last five years.