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Home » May 2008

Resources: May 2008

Indicators to Measure Violence Against Women

Sylvia Walby, Lancaster University, UK

*United Nations Statistical Commission & Economic Commission for Europe
*Conference of European Statisticians
*United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women

Iran: Flogging - Lashing

Head of Judiciary – Seyed Mamoud Shahroudi; Translated by: Dr. Soheila Vahdati

Translated by: Dr. Soheila Vahdati
Compared with the original text by: Nazanin Kiani Fard, Attorney at Law

Islamic Penal Code of Iran

Chapter Three

The Human Rights of Women -- Website

The People's Movement for Human Rights Education (PDHRE)

http://www.pdhre.org/rights/women.html

This is a useful site detailing issues concerning women's human rights.

From the homepage:
What are the Human Rights of Women?

Ending Footbinding and Infibulation: A Convention Account

December, 1996
Gerry Mackie, St. John's College, University of Oxford

This is a paper was published in the American Sociological Review, 1996, Col. 61 (December, pg.999-1017.)

Abstract:
Female genital mutilation in Africa persists despite modernization, public education, and legal prohibition. Female footbinding in China lasted for 1,000 years but ended in a single generation. 1 show that each practice is a self-enforcing convention, in Schelling's (1960) sense, maintained by interdependent expectations on the marriage market. Each practice originated under conditions of extreme resource polygyny as a means of enforcing the imperial male's exclusive sexual access to his female consorts. Extreme polygyny also caused a competitive upward flow of women and a downward flow of conjugal practices, accounting for diffusion of the practices. A Schelling coordination diagram explains how the three methods of the Chinese campaign to abolish footbinding succeeded in bringing it to a quick end. The pivotal innovation was to form associations of parents who pledged not to footbind their daughters nor let their sons marry footbound women. The "convention" hypothesis predicts that promotion of such pledge associations would help bring female genital mutilation to an end.

UN agencies rally to end to female genital mutilation within a generation

Ten United Nations agencies issued a joint statement on 27 February 2008 joining hands to help eliminate female genital mutilation within a generation and "stressing the need for strong leadership and greater resources to protect the health and lives of millions of women and girls".

Transnational Indicators to Measure Violence Against Women & Assess State Responses

Professor Liz Kelly

This is a powerpoint presentation by Professor Liz Kelly, Roddick Chair on Violence Against Women at London Metropolitan University. This may be useful towards a transnational methodology of researching and assessing violence against women.

UN Study on Freedom of Religion or Belief and the Status of Women from the Viewpoint of Religion and Traditions

April, 2009
Abdelfattah Amor, Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion or Belief

This is the official United Nations Study on Freedom of Religion or Belief and the Status of Women from the Viewpoint of Religion and Traditions (E/CN.4/2002) by Mr. Abdelfattah Amor, Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion or Belief (E/CN.4/1999/58) that led to his Study on Freedom of Religion or Belief and the Status of Women From the Viewpoint of Religion and Traditions (E/CN.4/2002/73/Add.2). The original is available only in the French language. An unofficial translation in English has been made by Dr. John Taylor, Secretary, Geneva U.N.

UN Website on Violence Against Women

http://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/vaw/indexnew.htm

This highly recommended website contains all the relevant UN documents related to the recently launched UN campaign on VAW.

From the site:

Crimes of honour in UN General Assembly Resolution - now available in 19 languages

October, 2004
UN General Assembly

Crimes of Honor UN Resolution in 19 Languages - Working towards the elimination of crimes against women and girls committed in the name of honour.