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IRAN Disciplining Bodies, Diagnosing Identities: Mandatory Veiling, Mandatory Sterilization, Sexual Torture and the Right to Bodily Integrity in the Islamic Republic of Iran

April, 2014

6 April 2014 

 

To read the full report please download the pdf.

 

Justice for Iran (JFI) highlights urgent concerns in submission to the 20th session of UPR Working Group on Islamic Republic of Iran.

Disciplining Bodies, Diagnosing Identities, Mandatory Veiling, Mandatory Sterilization, Sexual Torture and the Right to Bodily Integrity in the Islamic Republic of Iran, a submission by JFI highlights a number of areas of human rights violations targeted toward women and transgender people to the UN Universal Periodic Review of Iran, 20th Session of the UPR Working Group, October-November 2014.

35 Years of Forced Hijab: The Widespread and Systematic Violation of Women's Rights in Iran

March, 2014
Iran is the first country where all women are forced by law to observe hijab laws. Without espousing a clear definition of hijab, Islamic Republic laws consider women who lack “Islamic veil” in “public” as committing a crime punishable by imprisonment and fines. Based on Sharia laws, Islamic hijab implies covering hair and the entire body except for wrists and hands. However, a failure to observe hijab as determined by security or other official forces involve many other instances.

Stolen Lives, Empty Classrooms: An Overview on the Girl Marriages in Iran

October, 2013

Forced marriages result from harmful traditional practices1 justified in the name of cultural, economic, political and/or legal standards. Forced marriages are a phenomenon tantamount to slavery, as explicated in a report by a United Nations Special Rapporteur, and often affect boys and girls under 18 years of age, especially under 10. 2 Global statistics demonstrate that every minute an average of 27 girls are forced into marriage.

Crime & Impunity: A pioneering report on sexual torture in Iranian Prisons

December, 2012

On 10 December 2012, Justice for Iran launched this first-ever comprehensive report on sexual violence and torture in Iranian prisons.

This weighty report based on testimonials of victims, survivors, witnesses and experts, examines the extent to which women prisoners were systematically subjected to sexual violence as a gender-specific means of silencing young Iranian girls and women dissidents.

Visibility and Visuality: Reframing Gender in the Middle East, North Africa, and Their Diasporas

October, 2012

In conjunction with the Fertile Crescent: Gender, Art, and Society project initiated by the Rutgers Institute for Women and Art, Signs presents a special virtual issue addressing the complexity of women’s lives, livelihoods, and circumstances in North Africa, the Middle East, and their diasporas.

Activism Under the Radar: Volunteer Health Workers in Iran

May, 2009

Few would disagree that the 1979 Iranian revolution, despite the massive participation of women, rapidly became a catastrophe for women’s legal status and social position. Under the Shah, Iran had a mildly forward-looking family law limiting men’s rights to polygamy and unilateral divorce, and, at least theoretically, basing child custody on the best interests of the child. Within two weeks of the revolution, this legislation was annulled, on the grounds that it was against the shari‘a. The new Islamic Republic introduced retrograde laws that, among other things, valued a woman’s life at half of a man’s, and considered two women witnesses to be the equal of one man. The age of marriage as well as maturity for women was reduced to nine. At the same time, the regime promoted motherhood as the only viable life option for women and dismantled the family planning unit the Shah’s regime had founded. In 1989, concerned about the burgeoning population, the Islamic Republic made a volte face and introduced one of the most successful family planning programs in the developing world. In the process of transmitting health messages, however, these volunteers continuously found ways to redefine their mandate and expand their position in other areas of the public sphere.

Stones Aimed at Us: An Overview of the Discourse and Strategies of the Stop Stoning Forever Campaign

March, 2010

There has never been a clear and uncontroversial definition of religious fundamentalism and there is no consensus as to whether religious fundamentalism is a phenomenon, a movement, or a process. Nevertheless, having been exposed to religious fundamentalism in its fullest meaning after the 1979 Islamic Revolution, Iranian women and an analysis of their experience might offer a proper definition. This resource provides an overview of the discourses around the issue of stoning in Iran, and the strategies of the Stop Stoning Forever Campaign.

Stoning in Muslim Contexts: A Mapping Report

March, 2012

Women Living Under Muslim Laws, the Violence is not our Culture Campaign, and Justice for Iran are pleased to announce the release of a new publication:  Mapping Stoning in Muslim Contexts. This report locates where the punishment of stoning is still in practice, either through judicial (codified as law) or extrajudicial (outside the law) methods.   

Strategies of Resistance: Challenging the Cultural Disempowerment of Women

August, 2011

This book is an integral part of the Women Reclaiming and Redefining Cultures (WRRC) Programme, of which the VNC campaign is part. The publication presents the  strategies used by project partners to advance women’s rights in the face of culturally justified disempowerment and discusses their implementation in different contexts and in different thematic areas. This compilation is intended as a living resource, which will be amended and added to as women and organisations apply the strategies listed here to their own contexts, or try out new ones.

The Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran

October, 2011
UN Special Rapporteur on Iran - Ahmed Shaheed

The present report is submitted pursuant to Human Rights Council resolution 16/9, which establishes the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran. This is the first country mandate of the Human Rights Council on the Islamic Republic of Iran since the termination in 2002 of the mandate of the former Commission on Human Rights. The resolution mandates the Special Rapporteur to: (a) submit an interim report to the General Assembly at its sixty-sixth session and (b) to submit a report to the Human Rights Council for consideration at its nineteenth session. It also calls upon the Government of the Islamic Republic of Iran to cooperate fully with the mandate holder and to permit access to visit the country as well as provide all necessary information to enable the fulfilment of the mandate.

Sakineh, A Symbol of State Violence

March, 2011

This video marked the launch of the online campaign: Stop state violence against women in Iran!, which is a project by one of our partners, the Institute for Women's Empowerment (IWE). The campaign goal is to mobilise public opinion, both national and international, to stop Iranian state violence against women.

Iran: Executions by stoning

December, 2010

Death by stoning is the mandatory sentence for “adultery while married” in Iran. Even though a moratorium on such executions was announced in 2002, stonings continue.

Human Rights Crisis in Iran Press Conference

September, 2010
International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran

On Friday, September 17, 2010, the International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran, in partnership with Human Rights Watch and the Nobel Women's Initiative, held a panel discussion in New York on the human rights crisis in Iran. Panelists included Nobel Peace Prize Laureates Shirin Ebadi and Mairead Maguire, Iran researcher at Human Rights Watch Faraz Sanei, and Campaign Director Hadi Ghaemi.

Death by Stoning - Interview with Anne Harrison from Amnesty International & Ziba Mir Hosseini from SOAS

July, 2010
BBC Radio 4 (Women`s Hour)


Listen to the audio from BBC Radio 4 here

Judicial Stoning: Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani was found guilty of adultery by an Iranian court and was due to be stoned to death. Following a concerted campaign by her family and lawyers, it now seems that that sentence has been lifted, and campaigners are waiting to hear what will happen next.

List of Stoning Cases in Iran

July, 2010


Below is a list of those known to have been sentenced to stoning and or executed by stoning in Iran.


Stoning Victims:


1. Mahboubeh M (7 May 2006):  With Abbas H.