News and Views

Browse by Country

Browse by Region

You are here

Home » Afghanistan

News and Views: Afghanistan

New Afghanistan law to silence victims of violence against women

February 4, 2014

Sign WLUML's petition against this law here

A new Afghan law will allow men to attack their wives, children and sisters without fear of judicial punishment, undoing years of slow progress in tackling violence in a country blighted by so-called "honour" killings, forced marriage and vicious domestic abuse.

Afghanistan: Justice as Torture - Inside Badam Bagh Women’s Prison in Kabul

June 3, 2013

Listening to the women in Badam Bagh, it occurred to me that the entire justice system introduced in Afghanistan had become the cattle prod or taser in that story, an instrument of torture delivered perhaps with the best of intentions.

 

Afghanistan: Afghan protest against women's rights legislation

May 29, 2013

Hardline students protested in Afghanistan's capital, demanding the repeal of a presidential decree for women's rights that they say is un-Islamic. The protest came days after conservative politicians' vehement opposition blocked an attempt to cement the decree's provisions in law.

 

Afghanistan: Woman killed for “dishonouring” family

May 17, 2013

 

The public killing of a woman in Afghanistan is further proof that the authorities are still failing to tackle the shocking levels of gender-based violence in the country, Amnesty International said today. The woman, who has two children, was shot dead by her father in front of a crowd of about 300 people in the village of Kookchaheel, in the Aabkamari district of Badghis province in north-western Afghanistan.

Afghanistan: Women march against violence

February 14, 2013

KABUL, Afghanistan — Dozens of Afghan activists and supporters marked Valentine’s Day by marching in Kabul on Thursday to denounce violence against women amid reports that domestic abuse is on the rise.

Afghan women have made great strides in education and official circles since the days under Taliban rule, when they had to wear all-encompassing burqas and were not allowed to go to school or leave their homes without a male relative as an escort. But they still face widespread domestic violence, forced marriages and other problems.

Afghanistan: Female artist beats the odds to invigorate Kandahar’s art scene

February 2, 2013

Charred bodies lie scattered against blood-stained walls and debris covers the ground. The unusual thing in this gruesome scene is that the “blood” is red paint, and part of an art installation.

It’s a work by 23-year-old Afghan artist Malina Suliman. She risks her life, Suliman says, sometimes working by flashlight after dark, to create art in southern Kandahar province, still one of the most dangerous areas in the country.

"The Malala Effect" - Statement by UNHCHR on the occasion of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

November 23, 2012

“Ensuring women’s and girls’ rights, eliminating discrimination and achieving gender equality lie at the heart of the international human rights system, starting with article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which states unequivocally: ‘All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights…’

Honneur Aux Dissidents

October 16, 2012

Au cours de ces dernières semaines, et dans plusieurs pays, des groupes de citoyens ont ouvertement pris position contre les fondamentalistes musulmans, y compris leurs groupes armés.

Honour the Dissenters

October 16, 2012

In the past few weeks, in several countries, groups of citizens have openly taken a stand against Muslim fundamentalists, including armed ones.

Afghanistan: A husbands beheads his wife in the North

October 28, 2012

A man at the first day of Eid-ul-Adha decapitated his wife in the Dehdadi district of Northern Province of Balkh, police sources say.

The 30-year-old woman named Naseera, who was the mother of five children, was killed after she denied a very small request of her husband, according to police officials.

District police chief told Ariana TV that the victim’s husband, Shah Muhammad, was arrested red-handed and was in police custody.

The victim has left five children behind with the youngest child of two years of old.

Afghanistan: Female air force officer's story "most remarkable"

October 19, 2012

It is remarkable.

Eighteen months ago, Afghan defense officials, to their great credit in this male-dominated, ethnically-divided culture, sent four young female Afghan air force officers to the U.S. to learn English, the international language of aviation, and to train to become helicopter pilots.

Few people know that Afghanistan even has an air force -- even fewer that it has female officers.

Afghanistan: Dickinson College student works to end violence against women in Afghanistan

September 25, 2012

It’s hard to listen to Noorjahan Akbar.

Her English — which is one of the handful of languages she speaks fluently — is not the problem. The 21-year-old crafts eloquent sentences. Her voice rises and dips with emotion as she describes a passionate commitment to end physical abuse and economic oppression of her sister Afghanis.

No, it is the barriers Akbar confronts in seeking her goals that cause a listener to wince.

Her goals are simple to understand, at least in the Western world.

 

Afghanistan: Life under the burqa inspired struggle for democracy

September 10, 2012

Living conditions have improved in Afghanistan, especially for women. But many wonder what will happen when NATO troops leave in 2014. That year, Afghans also vote for their next president - who just might be a woman.

Under the Taliban, she dreamed of being out in the streets of Kabul without a burqa.

Life then was reduced to "looking at the huge world from the small window - that's how life was for a woman," Fawzia Koofi, a leading Afghan women's rights champion and lawmaker told Deutsche Welle.

Afghanistan: Fear doesn't keep Afghan girls away from schools

September 18, 2012

Gaining an education is still difficult for women in Afghanistan. The greatest opponent is fear. Cases of death threats, poisoning, acid attacks, and bombings by extremists groups, such as the Taliban, still continue. It is enough that any person would want to remain home. Threats from home are also as affective in keeping girls from school. However, there has been a recent change that shows women fighting to get their education.

Afghanistan: Teen Girl Flogged for Affair

September 16, 2012

The girl, who has been named only as Sabera, is in poor health since the incident on September 9 in Jaguri district of Ghazni province, said the head of the provincial women's affairs department, Shukuria Wali.

The Taliban have strongholds in Ghazni, but Jaguri is under government control and is dominated by ethnic Hazaras, who are generally considered moderate by Afghan standards and do not have strict tribal codes observed by Pashtuns, who dominate the ranks of the Islamist militia.

Afghanistan: Free Women Jailed for ‘Running Away’

September 18, 2012

High-level Afghan government officials have for the first time publicly confirmed that it is not a criminal offense for women and girls to “run away” from home, Human Rights Watch said today. The officials also confirmed fleeing violence or running away was not a basis for women’s detention or prosecution.

Afghanistan: The freedom of one internet cafe

September 7, 2012

Entering this tucked-away venue in the capital, male visitors cannot help feeling a sense of trepidation. Its name, Sahar Gul, conjures up thoughts of one of the country’s worst recorded cases of domestic violence, the imprisonment and torture of a 15-year-old Afghan girl by her husband and in-laws for refusing to work as a prostitute. Thankfully she survived, and stiff prison sentences were handed down to her tormentors.

Afghanistan: A New Powerpoint

September 7, 2012

Bearing the name of Sahar Gul, a young girl subjected to unspeakable horrors by her own relatives, a café in Kabul might not be expected to be a place of hope and calm. Yet Afghanistan’s first women-only internet centre launches a new forum for empowerment of half the population.

Afghanistan: End trend of Women Jailed for ‘Running Away’

September 18, 2012

(Kabul) – High-level Afghan government officials have for the first time publicly confirmed that it is not a criminal offense for women and girls to “run away” from home, Human Rights Watch said today. The officials also confirmed fleeing violence or running away was not a basis for women’s detention or prosecution.

Afghanistan: Series on Women Changing the World recognizes Leila Hakim-Ali

August 9, 2012

Afghanistan has one of the lowest consumption rates of electricity per person worldwide. To the outsider, this statistic may represent nothing more than the inevitable result of stalled reconstruction efforts or the mismanagement of funds. Yet to the people of rural Afghanistan, the lack of such a necessity manifests in a number of daily struggles.

Afghanistan: One woman's determination to educate young girls despite acid attacks and poison

August 2, 2012

Terrorists will stop at nothing to keep Afghan girls from receiving an education.

"People are crazy," said Razia Jan, founder of a girls' school outside Kabul. "The day we opened the school, (on) the other side of town, they threw hand grenades in a girls' school, and 100 girls were killed.

Afghanistan: Keeping Faith in Afghan Women's Advancement

July 10, 2012

Just over a decade ago, in January 2002, the world came together in Tokyo in the wake of the fall of the Taliban regime to pledge our common support for political, economic and social transition in Afghanistan.

We were well aware of the long-term nature of the commitment we were making, in line with the ancient Afghan proverb, "One flower will not make a spring."

Afghanistan: Execution highlights concerns about Afghan aid deal

July 9, 2012

News of the execution of an Afghan woman accused of adultery by the Taliban will press home the need to secure guarantees about women’s rights as the US prepares to withdraw its troops in 2014.

After international leaders at a Tokyoconference tied billions of dollars of aid to the need to fight corruption, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said that women should also “have the chance to benefit from and contribute to Afghanistan’s progress”.

Afghan Women & Poetry as Resistance

April 27, 2012

In a private house in a quiet university neighborhood of Kabul, Ogai Amail waited for the phone to ring. Through a plate-glass window, she watched the sinking sun turn the courtyard the color of eggplant. The electricity wasn’t working and the room was unheated, a few floor cushions the only furnishings. Amail tucked her bare feet underneath her and pulled up the collar of her puffy black coat. Her dark hair was tied in a ponytail, and her eyelids were coated in metallic blue powder. In the green glare of the mobile phone’s screen, her face looked wan and worried.

Afghanistan: Growing Violence Against Women, Government action needed

July 16, 2012

Pressing her cheek against the fresh grave of her newly married teenage daughter, Sabera yowls as she gently smears clumps of dirt over her tear-stained face.

"My daughter! Why did they kill you so brutally?" the mother screams in the sparsely filled cemetery in Parwan province, 65 km (40 miles) north of the Afghan capital, Kabul.

Sabera says her daughter Tamana was killed by a relative in a so-called "honor killing", in what officials link to a wider trend of rapidly growing violence against women in Afghanistan.

Afghanistan: Execution of Afghan Woman Causes Outraged Activists to Mobilize

July 11, 2012

Women’s rights activists marched in Kabul to protest the videotaped execution of a young woman, apparently by the Taliban.

Protesters say the killing shows the Taliban has not changed—and is a harbinger of what’s to come if they return to power.

Afghanistan: Police track woman’s executioners

July 9, 2012

KABUL: A manhunt was under way Monday for Taliban militants who publicly executed a woman accused of adultery, Afghan authorities said, as outrage mounted after a video of the cold-blooded killing surfaced.

The commander of Nato’s 130,000 troops in Afghanistan, General John Allen, offered to help local security forces track and capture the men involved in what he called “an atrocity of unspeakable cruelty”.

Afghanistan: First female village chief defies gender roles and strengthens community

May 29, 2012

In a male-dominated society that has for years been controlled by the ultra-conservative Taliban, the emergence of the first female village chief took everyone by surprise.

After being ridiculed by male villagers for wanting to occupy political office, Zarifa Qazizadah, the mother of 15 children, managed to become the mayor of Naw Abad, a village in the northern Balkh province.

Qazizadah’s political ambition started in 2004 when she told her mocking fellow villagers that she wanted to represent them and promised to supply Naw Abad with electricity.

Afghanistan: Women push for rights behind the wheel

May 15, 2012

(Reuters) - The morning after the Taliban fell Shakila Naderi shed her head-to-toe burqa, sat behind the wheel of a car for the first time and asked her husband to teach her how to drive.

Now Kabul's only female driving instructor, she teaches women a rare skill that confronts harsh opposition in ultra-conservative, Muslim Afghanistan.

Afghan Clerics' Conservative Blueprint for Women

March 7, 2012

As Afghanistan prepares to mark International Women’s Day on March 8, rights groups have expressed concern at a set of restrictive measures proposed by the country’s Council of Religious Scholars. Other commentators suspect the Islamic clerics of trying to win over insurgent groups like the Taleban by publicly espousing conservative views.

The 150-member council issued a “code of conduct” last week calling for segregation of the sexes in the workplace and in education, and barring women from travelling unless accompanied by a close male relative.

Afghanistan: "Baad" Abduction of Girls for Elders' Misdeeds

February 16, 2012

ASADABAD, Afghanistan — Shakila, 8 at the time, was drifting off to sleep when a group of men carrying AK-47s barged in through the door. She recalls that they complained, as they dragged her off into the darkness, about how their family had been dishonored and about how they had not been paid.

It turns out that Shakila, who was abducted along with her cousin as part of a traditional Afghan form of justice known as “baad,” was the payment.

South Asia: Focus of Global Activism Against Child Marriage

February 10, 2012

NEW DELHI, Feb 10 - Scores of South Asian charities struggling to curb high child-marriage rates are backing a global movement spearheaded by South African peace icon Archbishop Desmond Tutu to end the practice affecting millions of girls and women worldwide.

Representatives from charities in India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Sri Lanka gathered in New Delhi last week at the regional launch of the "Girls Not Brides" alliance – created by Tutu, 80, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 for speaking out against white minority rule in South Africa.

Afghanistan: Family Accused of Killing Woman for Not Bearing a Son

January 30, 2012

KABUL, Afghanistan — The young Afghan woman gave birth to a third girl three months ago — to a husband, the authorities say, who had been demanding a boy.

Last week, the man and his mother, in the northern Afghan province of Kunduz, put a rope around the woman’s neck and strangled her, the police said.

The body of the woman, known only as Storai, 22, was found by the police a few hours later in her room, and she was buried a day later, on Jan. 26.

Storai’s death was a chilling reminder of the low status of women in Afghanistan.

Afghanistan: TV challenges attitudes towards domestic violence

October 25, 2011

A radical television show is challenging attitudes to this abuse, inviting women to speak candidly and anonymously about their problems at home.

Afghanistan: The Battle for Schools - the Taleban and State Education

December 13, 2011

The report traces the different contestations around state education with a special focus on the past decade. In 2002, opening and building schools and getting Afghan boys and girls educated was a priority for the new government and its international backers. For the Taleban, one of the main tactics of their campaign against the government was to attack schools. The violence peaked in 2006, with dozens of students and teachers killed and hundreds of schools burned or forcibly shut down. However, there was a backlash.

Habiba Sarabi: ‘Violence against women still a problem in Afghanistan’

December 14, 2011

Habiba Sarabi is Afghanistan’s only female governor. She has headed Bamiyan province since 2005, engaged in rebuilding from scratch her part of one of the world’s most murderous countries.

A qualified doctor, she left Afghanistan under the Taliban, but returned in secret to teach girls.

Today, still the target of death threats, she continues her struggle to put her country back on its feet.

euronews: “Habiba Sarabi, you are a prominent figure in Afghanistan. How does it feel to be a major female politician in a male-dominated society?”

Afghanistan: Woman left to Marry her Attacker to Obtain Release from Jail

December 1, 2011

An Afghan woman jailed for adultery after she was raped by a relative is set to be freed – but only after agreeing to marry the man who attacked her.

The case, which has highlighted the plight of Afghan women jailed for so-called moral crimes, was to be the subject of a documentary film funded by the European Union – until diplomats censored it out of fear for the woman's welfare, and for their relations with the Afghan government.

Afghanistan: EU Suppresses Its Film on Afghan Women's Prisons

November 15, 2011

One woman is doing 12 years in prison for being the victim of a rape. The second is in jail for running from an abusive husband. Both say they want to tell their stories, and yet a film about their plight has been scrapped, sparking controversy about how committed the international community is to fighting for women's rights in Afghanistan.

Afghanistan: Women Face Rising Danger If Excluded From Peace Talks

October 3, 2011

(WNN) KABUL: On the tenth anniversary of the U.S. war in Afghanistan, a new October 3, 2011 Oxfam report on progress for Afghan women shows steady advances for Afghan women since October 2001. But recent data shows women’s personal safety, opportunity and human rights inside the nation are beginning to erode back to conditions that existed previously. 

Afghanistan: Raising Hope for Women

October 6, 2011

Ten years ago, a massive feminist experiment began in Afghanistan. But can the advances in education and women's rights be sustained, even when the troops leave?

Afghanistan: Women's Groups Secure Independence of Shelters

September 26, 2011

In Afghanistan, women's groups are claiming a rare victory. Last winter, the government was planning to bring battered women's shelters under government control.

Women's rights advocates sprang into action, complaining that the new rules would turn shelters into virtual prisons for women who had run away from home because of abuse. But after a flurry of media attention, the Afghan government agreed to re-examine the issue. And this month, President Hamid Karzai's Cabinet quietly approved a new draft that has support from women's groups.

Afghanistan: Government Campaign Against Self-Immolation

September 6, 2011

The Afghan government has launched a national media campaign to address the growing problem of self-immolation. Most people who set fire to themselves, on purpose or by accident, are women. Many try to commit suicide because they are victims of domestic violence and other forms of abuse.

Listen to the BBC interview with women's rights activist Horia Mosadiq on why women are setting themselves alight here

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-14810719

Afghanistan: Women in Media Reveal Risks & Challenges

July 5, 2011

KABUL (Reuters) - Farida Nekzad has faced threats of kidnapping, acid attacks and a plot to blow up her apartment since she founded her first news agency in Afghanistan seven years ago.

Members of the Taliban e-mailed some of the warnings; others arrived over the phone. One caller warned she would be murdered and disfigured so horrendously that her family would not be able to recognize her body.

In Afghanistan, Rage at Young Lovers

July 30, 2011

HERAT, Afghanistan — The two teenagers met inside an ice cream factory through darting glances before roll call, murmured hellos as supervisors looked away and, finally, a phone number folded up and tossed discreetly onto the workroom floor.

A car burned by a crowd during a riot that took place after the police rescued two teenagers from a group of men who had demanded that they be hanged or stoned for their relationship.

Afghanistan: Demanding Dignity on Kabul’s Streets, Afghan Women March Against Sexual Harassment

July 25, 2011

Holding signs that read “This street belongs to me too”; “We won’t tolerate insults anymore”; and a banner with a verse from the Koran emphasizing the wrongness of abusing women, around 30 young Afghan women and men marched in the sweltering afternoon heat to protest the rampant and often violent sexual harassment of women and girls on Kabul’s streets.

Afghanistan: Suspect in Mutilation Case Is Freed

July 11, 2011

KABUL, Afghanistan — The only suspect arrested in the case of a woman mutilated for leaving her husband has been released, local Afghan officials and the woman’s father said Monday, in a move that has angered human rights advocates and the woman’s family.

Afghanistan: Making Peace With The Taliban At The Cost of Women’s Rights

October 8, 2010

Massouda Jalal is a psychiatrist and paediatrician based in Afghanistan. After the fall of Taliban in 2001, she emerged as a powerful voice of Afghan women and later contested the 2004 elections as a presidential candidate. Jalal was minister for women's affairs in the Hamid Karzai government for a brief while. As director of Jalal Foundation, she travels across Afghanistan to champion women's empowerment and rights. She spoke to Ashima Kaul.

Afghanistan: Authorities must look to the International Criminal Court to prosecute Taliban attacks

June 28, 2011

The Afghan government must work with the International Criminal Court to investigate those responsible for war crimes and crimes against humanity in Afghanistan, Amnesty International said today, after an attack on a Kabul hotel claimed by the Taleban left at least 10 people dead.

Afghanistan: Virginity-related penalties unfair for women

April 26, 2011

Virginity is not mentioned in the Afghan penal system and other laws, but hundreds of women unfairly face penalties over it.

Afghanistan: Tribal Elders in Khost Have Banned the Use of Girls as Reparation for Crimes and Limited the Bride-Price

May 1, 2011


Until very recently, it was common in Nadir Shah Kot to give a girl away as reparation to avenge a crime. The family of a murderer would marry off a daughter to the victim’s brother or son. It was believed, that in this way, harmony could be restored in the community.

Those who follow the tradition will be punished.

Afghanistan: Taliban kills head of girls school

May 25, 2011


Taliban
 gunmen have killed the headteacher of a girls' school near the Afghan capital after he ignored warnings to stop teaching girls, government officials have said.

Khan Mohammad, the head of the Porak girls' school in Logar province, was shot dead near his home on Tuesday, said Deen Mohammad Darwish, a spokesman for the Logar governor.

"He was killed because he wanted to run the school," Darwish said.

Afghanistan: Virginity-related penalties "extremely unfair"

April 26, 2011


KABUL, 26 April 2011 (IRIN) - The penalties that Afghan women suffer whenever allegations of pre-marital sex and loss of virginity emerge, including death, are extreme, discriminatory and not in the penal code, activists said.

“I saw a woman who was publically humiliated and tortured because she had allegedly lost her virginity before her wedding night,” said Suraya Subhrang, a women’s rights commissioner at the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC). Extra-judiciary penalties, she added, were prevalent and deep-rooted in the country.

VNC: Secure the independence of women's shelters in Afghanistan.

February 22, 2011


Uphold the rights of Afghan women and girls to be freed from gender-based violence. Secure the independence of women's shelters in Afghanistan.

The Global Campaign to Stop Violence against Women in the Name of ‘Culture’, an international network of women’s human rights defenders and advocates, fully supports our sisters in Afghanistan in resisting their government’s attempt to put the country’s women shelters under State control.

Afghanistan: Proposal Would Clamp Down on Women’s Shelters

February 10, 2011


KABUL, Afghanistan — After her parents threw her out of the house for refusing to marry a 52-year-old widower with five children, Sabra, 18, boarded a bus that dropped her, afraid and confused, in downtown Kabul. She slept in a mosque for days, barely eating, until a woman took pity on her and put her in touch with human rights workers, who escorted her to a women’s shelter.

Afghanistan: Police pledge justice for Taliban stoning

January 26, 2011


The BBC's Quentin Sommerville: ''For Siddqa, the hole where she stood is now her grave''

The men who stoned a couple to death in north Afghanistan will be brought to justice, say officials, after footage of the killings came to light.

<--break->The man and woman were accused of adultery in the district of Dashte Archi in Kunduz province last August.

Afghanistan: Violence and tradition keep millions of Afghans from school

January 1, 2011


KABUL, Jan 1 (Reuters) - Worsening security and enduring conservative Islamic customs prevented almost five million Afghan children from going to school in 2010, a government official said on Saturday.

The strict Islamist Taliban were ousted from power by U.S.-backed Afghan forces nearly a decade ago, but many women are still not able to work outside the home and girls are prevented from attending school in remote parts of the country.

Afghanistan: Widow Burnings, Violations

November 7, 2010


HERAT, Afghanistan — Even the poorest families in Afghanistan have matches and cooking fuel. The combination usually sustains life. But it also can be the makings of a horrifying escape: from poverty, from forced marriages, from the abuse and despondency that can be the fate of Afghan women.

Facing social pressures, families disguise girls as boys in Afghanistan

September 20, 2010

 

KABUL, Afghanistan — Six-year-old Mehran Rafaat is like many girls her age. She likes to be the center of attention. She is often frustrated when things do not go her way. Like her three older sisters, she is eager to discover the world outside the family’s apartment in their middle-class neighborhood of Kabul.

Afghan Women's Movements Deserve More From the West

August 3, 2010

 

Time magazine's moving portrayal of the plight of Afghanistan's women is a tribute to their heroism and silent suffering. However, the poignant images and story fail to reflect the determined achievements of a women's movement that has battled cultural and Islamist misogyny. They deserve more from the West.

Crime (Sex) and Punishment (Stoning)

August 21, 2010

 

It may be the oldest form of execution in the world, and it is certainly among the most barbaric. In the West, death by stoning is so remote from experience that it is best known through Monty Python skits and lurid fiction like Shirley Jackson’s short story “The Lottery.”

AFGHANISTAN: Stop stoning and other forms of cruel punishments by the Taliban

August 18, 2010

 

The Global Campaign to Stop Killing and Stoning Women and the Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML) International Solidarity Network condemn the recent incidents of violent punishments by the Taliban in Afghanistan.   

Female Afghan Governor Fears Taliban Deal

July 19, 2010

On the eve of an international conference in Afghanistan, the country’s only female governor told Britain’s Channel 4 News that Afghan women should not have to sacrifice their rights as part of any peace agreement with the Taliban.

 

 

Afghanistan: 'Shaming' her in-laws costs 19 year old her nose, ears

March 18, 2010


"When they cut off my nose and ears, I passed out," 19-year-old Bibi Aisha of Afghanistan says with chilling candor.

Her beauty is still stunning and her confidence inspiring. It takes a moment for the barbaric act committed against her to register in your mind and sight.

Wearing her patterned scarf and with roughly painted nails she shares her story.

"It felt like there was cold water in my nose, I opened my eyes and I couldn't even see because of all the blood," she remembers.

Afghanistan: School girls hospitalized - Suspect poisoning

June 13, 2010


Kabul, Afghanistan -- About 60 schoolgirls in Afghanistan's Balkh province appear to have been poisoned and required hospitalization, the Ministry of Health said Sunday. The victims ranged in age from 9 to 14.

Most suffered minor reactions, ministry spokesman Sakhi Kargan told CNN. It's at least the third suspected poisoning of girls attending schools in Afghanistan this week.

Afghanistan: Attack on female politician highlights growing risk for Afghan women in public life

April 8, 2010


The shooting of a female Afghan politician on Monday demonstrates the fragility of the modest gains made by Afghan women after the fall of the Taleban, Amnesty International said on Thursday.

Nida Khyani, a female Provincial Council member, was left in critical condition after being attacked in a drive-by shooting in Pul-e-Khumri, the provincial capital of Baghlan in northern Afghanistan.

Afghanistan: Any agreement with Taliban must include women's rights - UN CEDAW Committee

Afghanistan: any agreement with the Taliban must include women’s rights - UN experts’ body

GENEVA (5 February 2010) - The Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women said Friday that “any agreement reached with the Taliban in Afghanistan should include a clear commitment to respect and protect women’s human rights.” The Committee urged the Afghan government and its international allies “to ensure that women representatives are included in the upcoming peace and development dialogues and negotiations with the Taliban,”

AFGHANISTAN - RAPE OF WOMEN & GIRLS IS A PROFOUND PROBLEM - UN

By REUTERS - November 30, 2009

KABUL (Reuters) - Rape in Afghanistan is under-reported, concealed and a human rights problem of "profound proportions," the United Nations said on Monday.

Broaching Birth Control With Afghan Mullahs

Broaching Birth Control With Afghan Mullahs
By SABRINA TAVERNISE

Huma's Story - Forced Child Marriage - Abuse, Torture, Escape

Women for Afghan Women
http://www.womenforafghanwomen.org/

Quarterly E-Newsletter, Itihad-E-Zan - Inaugural Issue

Huma's Story - Forced Child Marriage - Abuse, Torture, Escape

Afghanistan: Girls targeted in gas attack

Afghanistan: Girls targeted in gas attack

14/05/2009: Taliban militants blamed after 90 pupils poisoned in third attack on girls' school in three weeks. (The Independent)

Afghan leader accused of bid to 'legalise rape'

UN and women MPs say Karzai bowed to Islamic fundamentalists before poll

Afghan singer fears honor killings

KABUL (AFP) — Lema Sahar never ventured out in public without an all-enveloping burqa -- not until she jumped on stage and sang her heart out in the Afghan version of "American Idol".

Afghan Women Slowly Gaining Protection

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/03/02/world/03shelter.600.jpg"

AFGHANISTAN: Butchered in the name of honour

KABUL, 8 January 2009 (IRIN) - Maryam, 14, was raped by a man in the Yakawlang District of Bamyan Province, central Afghanistan, five months ago. Her mother and brother used razor blades to cut the girl open, take out the foetus, and bury it alive to hide the disgrace, according to Habiba Surabi, the governor of Bamyan.

Maryam had initially concealed the rape, fearing this could devastate her family and possibly end her own life. But five months later, when it became clear that she was carrying a baby, her family decided to “remedy” the problem.