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Whipping or Lashing

Pakistan: Court rules drinking alcohol is not haram, should not be punished

July 31, 2011

The Federal Shariat Court (FSC) has declared whipping for the offence of drinking as un-Islamic and directed the government to amend the law to make the offence bailable.

A full-bench of the FSC comprising Chief Justice Haziqul Khairi, Justice Salahuddin Mirza and Justice Fida Mohammad Khan gave the ruling on Thursday after hearing the arguments that the Holy Quran asks Muslims to stay away from liquor but does not specifically declares it Haram, or prohibited.

Bangladesh: Protect women against 'fatwa' violence

July 6, 2011

Despite court orders, government has failed to intervene. 

(Dhaka) - The Bangladesh government should take urgent measures to make sure that religious fatwas and traditional dispute resolution methods do not result in extrajudicial punishments, Human Rights Watch said today.  The government is yet to act on repeated orders of the High Court Division of the Supreme Court, beginning in July 2010, to stop illegal punishments such as whipping, lashing, or public humiliations, said the petitioners who challenged the practice.

Indonesia: Government must repeal caning bylaws in Aceh

May 22, 2011


The Indonesian government must end the use of caning as a form of punishment and repeal the laws that allow it in Aceh province, Amnesty International said today after at least 21 people were publicly caned since 12 May.

In Langsa city, 14 men were caned outside the Darul Falah mosque on 19 May, following the caning of seven men a week earlier.

All 21 were found to have violated an Aceh bylaw (qanun) prohibiting gambling and were given six lashes each as hundreds of people looked on.

Bangladesh: Four arrested for the death of 14 year old Hena Begum

February 2, 2011


Four people including a Muslim cleric have been arrested in Bangladesh in connection with the death of 14-year-old girl who was publicly lashed.

The teenager was accused of having an affair with a married man, police say, and the punishment was given under Islamic Sharia law.

<--break->Hena Begum's family members said a village court consisting of elders and clerics passed the sentence.

Human Rights Watch: End Lashing, Reform Public Order Rules

December 18, 2010


(Nairobi) December 15, 2010 -- The arrest of more than 60 Sudanese women's rights activists on December 14, 2010, for peacefully protesting the lashing of a woman by police shows the urgent need to reform Sudan's public order laws and practices, Human Rights Watch said today. The system imposes illegitimate restrictions on a range of personal behavior and public expression and disproportionately targets women, Human Rights Watch said.

Aceh: Caning of Two Women for Selling Rice during Ramadan

October 15, 2010


The Global Campaign to Stop Killing and Stoning Women! (SKSW) and the International Solidarity Network, Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML) are outraged by the caning of two women in Aceh for selling cooked rice during Ramadan.

Please find sample letter attached at the bottom of this page.

The sentence was carried out on October 1st, 2010 to Murni binti Amris (27) and Rukiah binti Abdullah (22). The caning took place outside the Munawwarah Mosque in Jantho, Aceh Besar after the Friday prayers and was witnessed by the public.

Aceh: Three Lashes for Selling Cooked Rice During Ramadan

October 2, 2010


Jantho, Aceh. With heads bowed, two young women walked toward a wooden stage outside Al Munawwarah Mosque in Jantho, Aceh Besar. Friday prayers had just ended, and hundreds of residents surrounded the platform, keeping a respectful distance but keen to watch. 

The eyes of Murni binti Amris, 27, and Rukiah binti Abdullah, 22, began to water. 

They feared the worst when officers of the Shariah Police dragged them to the center of the stage. 

Shariah in Aceh: Eroding Indonesia’s Secular Freedoms

August 18, 2010


A woman is caned and shamed in Aceh’s Pidie Jaya district for breaking Shariah bylaws. It is unclear who was actually behind the implementation of Shariah and resistance to the controversial code is growing.  (Antara Photo/Rahmad)

No Justice in Justifications: Violence Against Women in the Name of Culture, Religion and Tradition

March, 2010
Shaina Grieff

English |  Français 

This briefing presents a survey of culturally justified violence against women, including how violence against women is justified by 'culture', the different forms this violence can take, and recommendations for change. The SKSW Campaign is undertaking projects on 'culture', women and violence, with partners in Senegal, Afghanistan, Nigeria, Pakistan, Indonesia, Iran, and Sudan.

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