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Domestic Violence

Pakistan: Push to Pass Provincial Domestic Violence Bill

October 21, 2011

If your husband raises his hand on you, and you are a constant victim of physical violence, humiliation and verbal abuse, a time may come when you say “enough is enough”.

Mexico: Women Reject Normalisation of Gender Violence

November 24, 2011

Ninety percent of the non-governmental organisations in Mexico are founded and run by women, says journalist and women's rights activist Lydia Cacho Ribeiro, even as crimes against women remain cloaked in impunity.

Germany: Support & Counselling for Muslim Women in Germany

March 30, 2008

Cologne (WeNews\WFS) – Most of Louise Becker's 12-hour workdays are hidden behind a bright orange door in suburban Cologne, Germany. There she counsels Muslim women through family and marriage problems. The meetings are secret to prevent harassment from the women's husbands, fathers and brothers.

Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women Report to UN General Assembly 2011

August, 2011

This is the first written report submitted by the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences, Rashida Manjoo, to the General Assembly, pursuant to General Assembly resolution 65/187. The report provides an overview of the mandate’s work and main findings and the challenges it continues to encounter, and presents specific recommendations to address violence against women through a holistic framework based on States’ obligations to respect, protect and fulfil the human rights of women and girls.

Lebanon: Engaging Men in Ending Violence Against Women

October 11, 2011

“Ending violence against women and having a society that truly espouses the principles of gender equality can only be done when men and women work together, side by side, as partners in achieving that goal.”

Pakistan: Guns Aimed Increasingly at Women

September 30, 2011

PESHAWAR - Guns available in new abundance in the troubled north of Pakistan are increasingly being used on women in ‘honour’ killings and domestic disputes, according to local reports.

"About 65 percent of the women killed fall prey to gunfire in honour-related cases and issues relating to domestic violence," local security analyst Brigadier (retired) Muhammad Saad told IPS. 

Are women with secure land rights less vulnerable to domestic violence?

July 28, 2011

The problem of domestic violence in the world can seem intractable. In a recent report, UN Women notes that in 17 out of 41 countries, “a quarter or more of people think that it is justifiable for a man to beat his wife.”[1]

Think about that. In almost half of the countries the report studied, more than 25% of people think that husbands have a right to hurt their wives, that they have a right to use physical violence as a punishment and a method of control.

Religiosity, Christian Fundamentalism, And Intimate Partner Violence Among U.S. College Students

January, 2010

Student survey data show general religiosity did not correlate with violence approval, psychological aggression, or intimate partner violence, but Christian fundamentalism did with violence approval and intimate partner violence. Read the study here.

Afghanistan: Government Campaign Against Self-Immolation

September 6, 2011

The Afghan government has launched a national media campaign to address the growing problem of self-immolation. Most people who set fire to themselves, on purpose or by accident, are women. Many try to commit suicide because they are victims of domestic violence and other forms of abuse.

Listen to the BBC interview with women's rights activist Horia Mosadiq on why women are setting themselves alight here

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-14810719

Council of Europe Convention calls for hotlines, shelters, medical and forensic services

September 1, 2011

Hamiyet, a member of Turkey’s Kurdish minority, was a 15-year-old newlywed when her husband began beating her every evening after work. He hit her when she was pregnant with each of their nine children, and he raped her almost nightly. She sought help from the police, but they always sent her back home, more concerned with preserving “family unity” than with her safety.

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