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Acid Attacks

Remembering Fakhra Yunus

March 29, 2012

Yesterday, approximately a month after the documentary Saving Face won an Oscar for best short film, a victim of an acid attack, Fakhra Yunus committed suicide. Saving Face explored acid attacks, and how they affect women across the world, including in Pakistan.

Pakistan: Pro-women laws take hold

March 26, 2012

Women in Pakistan have faced formidable challenges in their efforts to achieve gender equality and address gender-based violence in their country, with particular problems posed by elements among customary norms and practices.

Yet throughout the past few years, breakthroughs in pro-women legislation have shown that both the efforts of Pakistan’s government, and the advocacy of groups working toward women’s empowerment in the country, are taking effect.

Pakistan Crime Bills Must be Springboard for Better Women's Rights

December 13, 2011

Pakistan authorities must take concrete steps to end violence against women, Amnesty International said today after the country's Senate unanimously passed two landmark women's rights bills. 

The Acid Control and Acid Crime Prevention Bill 2010 and The Prevention of Anti-Women Practices (Criminal Law Amendment) Bill 2008 aim to empower and protect women and increase penalties for perpetrators of gender-based violence. 

Pakistan: Senate Unanimously Passes Two Bills Protecting Against Forced Marriage and Acid Attacks

December 12, 2011

ISLAMABAD: The Upper House of the Parliament on Monday unanimously passed two landmark pro-women bills aimed at protecting women from the negative customs and traditions and seeking severe punishments for the violators.

“Strengthening the protection of women from torture and ill-treatment” Statement by Manfred Nowak

September, 2011

This statement was originally presented at the side-event “Acid burning attacks – victimization, survivors, support”, sponsored by Women’s UN Report Network, Worldwide Organization for Women and NGO Committee on the Status of Women- Geneva.

Pakistan: Suffering In Silence

September 28, 2011

Being beaten almost daily by her husband is a routine part of Saadia Bibi’s life. “Ever since I was married nearly seven years ago, I have been slapped, punched or kicked virtually every day. Once or twice my husband has burnt me with cigarettes,” she told IRIN in Multan, in conservative southern Punjab, displaying the distinct, circular scars on her shoulders and legs.

An Eye for an Eye: Iran's Blinding Justice System

May 15, 2011


Iran's judiciary has postponed the blinding of a man as punishment for throwing acid in the face of a young woman in 2004, after she rejected his offer of marriage. The delay came in the face of mounting outcry from both inside Iran and the West over the sentence, which is permissible under qesas, a principle of Islamic law allowing victims analogous retribution for violent crimes.

Afghanistan: Schoolgirl Acid Attack Victims Demand Justice

May, 2011
Al-Jazeera

Last year, Al Jazeera reported on two teenage girls who suffered appalling injuries when acid was thrown in their faces on their way to school in Afghanistan. It was one of a series of attacks blamed on the Taliban. Shamsia Husseina and her sister Atifa returned to school in January, determined to continue their education. But new threats have left them living in fear for their lives once again. Al Jazeera's Teresa Bo reports.

Pakistan: National Assembly unanimously approves Acid Control and Acid Crime Prevention Bill 2010

May 10, 2011


QUETTA: The National Assembly on Tuesday unanimously approved the Acid Control and Acid Crime Prevention Bill 2010.

The bill was introduced last year by MNAs Marvi Memon, Begum Shahnaz Sheikh and Advocate Anusha Rehman in a bid to prevent growing incidents of violence against women.

Offenders will now be punished with life or up to 40 years imprisonment and will have to pay rupees one million to the victim.

Combatting Acid Violence in Bangladesh, India and Cambodia

March, 2011

Acid violence involves intentional acts of violence in which perpetrators throw, spray, or pour acid onto victims’ faces and bodies. This Report examines acid violence in Bangladesh, India, and Cambodia from an international human rights perspective. Using this framework, it identifies the causes of acid violence and suggests practical solutions to address them. Acid violence is prevalent in these countries because of three related factors: gender inequality and discrimination, the easy availability of acid, and impunity for acid attack perpetrators.

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